Cut roses care

How to care for cut roses

If you’re lucky enough to receive roses, here are some care and handling tips to enjoy your roses longer.

A fresh rose can last for 10-14 days. Poor handling from the grower to the merchandiser will reduce longevity dramatically.

For maximum vase life,  it is important that the flowers are conditioned properly.
Roses do not like to be out of water for too long of a period of time, so as soon as you buy/receive them, remove the lower leaves, put the roses in a bucket of warm water with floral preservative and recut each stem 1/2-1 inch. Fill a vase with tepid water and freshly mixed preservative and immediately transfer the flowers into the vase.

Re-cutting under warm water (100-110 degrees) facilitates faster water uptake and removes any blockage caused by air, bacteria and debris. A rose stem is like a drinking straw, water will flow with in 2 seconds. If you don’t put the stem in water immediately after cutting, air will block the water from going up the stem. This is especially beneficial for flowers with tight buds.

Troubleshooting roses

Stems are limp and flowers drooped in a day
Bent neck syndrome is usually due to water-related problems. Flowers may have been dry too long and the stem may be blocked. Recut the stems as directed and hydrate in tepid water.

Roses did not open
Hydration problem (water uptake) Flowers may have been harvested too early with the buds too tight or the roses may be too old.

Flowers opened too fast and didn’t last long
“Blowing” of roses is temperature related use of too warm water. However there are new varieties that open quickly but they last a long time after opening.

Petals started drooping in a day
Premature petal drop may be due to age, temperature, water problems or ethylene exposure.

Keep your rose arrangement away from direct sunlight, heating and air-conditioning vents. Change the water every two or three days, recut the stems and add fresh floral preservative.

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